JRM FOUNDATION FOR HUMANITY – THE FACES OF HOPE

FACES OF HOPE

A Photographic Journey from Bricks to Books

28 million people around the world are victims of bonded slavery. Roughly 18 million of them are children.

JRM Foundation for Humanity - in partnership with our organization's young Ambassador's - have committed to breaking the cycle of poverty and indentured servitude through education.

The Face of Hope is the photographic story
of some of these children's journey from bricks to books.

Help Us ERADICATE
Child Labor and Bonded Slavery
ONE CHILD at a Time.


The Faces of Hope is a photographic journey of our work around the world. Our first expo was held in collaboration with The College of Arts, Idaho State University. The first expo depicted the photos of young kids who were victims able to get out of their bonded slavery and get to school. Our mission is the take this traveling expo of the photographs around the country and display them in local galleries.

We seek to free children from the evils of Child Labor and Bonded Slavery.

Come along with us on our journey to share FACES OF HOPE photographs around the country and help us make a difference, ONE CHILD at a time.

Aasha aka Hope
Location: Brick Kiln Bhaktapur, Nepal 2013
 
My first photograph communicates what the JRM Foundation for Humanity is committed to help change.
 
I took my first photograph as I walked into a dusty brick kiln off the main street. I was immediately confronted with this little seven-year-old girl. When my camera’s shutter clicked it forever captured her eyes, devoid of hope. I was not allowed to speak to her. I was not given a name, either, but when I saw those empty eyes, I immediately called her “Aasha,” which means, “Hope,” in the native language.
 
This is where my journey from “Bricks to Books” begins. You are about to embark on an emotional roller coaster ride, but my goal is not for you to feel sorry for these children. Instead, figure out how you as an individual and as a member of a community can engage.
 
“Compassion with no action is no compassion at all, it is just feeling sorry for someone.” – Viviane Harr

Faces of Hope - Aasha
Boy and the Garbage Collector
Location: Streets of Pokhara, Nepal
 
This is one of my favorite photographs, despite the fact that I felt completely hopeless when I took it.
 
In all the other images throughout the Faces of Hope photo gallery, the people are looking straight into your eyes through the camera lens. I kept hoping this child would raise his head, look straight into the camera, and into my eyes. He never did. He is in complete despair. He has likely walked this route for years, and is not interested in anything or in his surroundings.
 
Complete and utter despair can crush a soul.
 
“History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people.” – Martin Luther King Jr.

Boy and the Garage Collector
Aasha Toiling in the Sun
Location: Brick Kiln Bhaktapur, Nepal 2013
 
Another photo of Aasha, ten hours a day toiling in the sun – no sunscreen, no shoes.
 
“History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people.” – Martin Luther King Jr.

Aasha Toiling in the Sun
Boy With No Name
Location: Phewa Lake, Nepal
 
While on my way to lunch with my daughter, we met this young boy who belongs to a lower caste. Like many children in his position, he spends most of his time begging on the streets for his handlers. Instead of giving him money (that I knew would be taken away by his handlers), I asked him to join us for lunch.”
 
After I invited him to eat with us, he disappeared and returned 15 minutes later with his sister. They both enjoyed that lunch like you and I would enjoy winning the lottery.
 
“History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people.” – Martin Luther King Jr.

Boy With No Name
Young Boy with a Shovel
Young Boy with a Wheelbarrow